Using photoscanning to create a tiny world



Here is a look at an art test for my game about helping tiny spirits in glass jars!


For the bottom of the jar I used a technique called "photoscanning" or photogrammetry.


Basically you take lots of photos of an object (in this case in the freezing cold) and then use specialized software to create a 3D model of it. The tool looks at how the different images overlap to create a 3D model - much like with panoramo photo tools.


The game itself is about helping tiny spirits that live in glass jars! Here is a look at the main character "Sprout".

Thanks for looking! Follow me on itch.io to keep updated on the game.

Comments

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(+1)

Oh some details would be nice :) What program did you use and would you do it for larger projects?

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Sure! Still looking for a super easy tutorial on photogrammetry, but for now that's the best I have: https://blog.sketchfab.com/how-to-set-up-a-successful-photogrammetry-project/

It's a good tutorial (I learned photoscanning with it), but it's a bit too much info at once imo.

Also software wise there are many options out there, both for phone and PC, some free and opensource. I personally use Agisoft Photoscan which is paid software and I heard from multiple people that RealityCapture is also really good.

For larger projects .. yeah maybe, but not solely. In my terms this project will be a bit larger. Photogrammetry is really good at capturing rough, non-reflective surfaces like rocks or wood & can be used for hyperrealistic games quite well in this regard. But if you want to do foliage or transparent materials you need to resort to other methods (well there is a work-around for transparent stuff, but usually you can't do everything in a game with photogrammetry). 

It's also hard to capture moving objects, so you also need to work around that.

It also comes with quite some tedious work .. waiting for stuff to render, cleaning the model, creating good UVs, setting up materials ... but I think the results are really good! Personally I use it because I can use my skills from my photographic background :)